The Problem with Mint


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My mint is become invasive. I do not mind it spreading into the grass, but I worry that it might push out other plants in the garden beds.

Flowers, flowers, and more flowers. That has been my gardening life for the past week. I went to Corneilius on Voss (north of Westheimer), and the children became excited with the multi-colored blooms. Since we are spending more time in the backyard, we began planting in beds, pots, and wherever else they decided (my hat turned out to be popular). That is when I noticed that some mint was filling out the open spaces in a bed, and it was beginning to move in the other areas.

    When mint begins to spread into my grass, I am quite happy. Cutting the grass releases their scent; however, in my beds, I do not want the mint crowding out some other favorites. My soultion is to start my harvesting, and to harvest heavy. Now I have quite a bit of mint to use.
    Making mint tea works for me. We have been spending our evenings in the garden, and the tea is a nice accompaniment. I added mint to my rice for one meal, but I added it too soon. The mint was overcooked. All fresh herbs should be added at the ended of cooking. For my next meal, I sauteed carrots and apples. The carrots are going to seed, but I harvested some before they began to flower. I usually add green onions to this dish, but I noticed that the family has not been eating them much recently. I have an apple tree in my yard. The tree is the type developed in Israel, and I feel that I will have apples once the tree establishes itself. The apples from the dish were Fujis. My son loves Fujis, and they had some large ones at Canino’s. When the carrots had softened, I added a handful of chopped mint. This went well with the roasted pork.
    My lemon tree is in bloom, so I am thinking of the future. A sauce of mint, lemon, garlic, and olive oil. With the garlic and shallots growing, I could make a vinagrette with the leaves of those plants and the mint. So tonight a salad? Oh, this might go well over chicken. Should I be concerned about overdoing the mint? I guess that I should be handing packages of mint to family.
    I need to keep thinking about uses for mint. I will start drying the mint for later. Maybe I could use it as a spray for freshening up the home? We will see how that goes down. How would you use so much mint?

2 Responses to “The Problem with Mint”

  • I too am an avid gardener. Planted most of this years seeds with the nieces this past Saturday; fun for all of us. I was thinking of planting mint and though I knew it loved yards, I hadn’t considered its invasiveness to other areas. Maybe I will plant it it in a planter instead. Thoughts…

  • Frank Schulte-Ladbeck says:

    Well I know that you have a great garden Rich. Once mint becomes established it can be a bit aggressive. Container gardening can be great option for it. I have to see what will happen in one of my beds, so far it is playing nice with its neighbors, but I did place my mint plants in smaller contained beds.

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Greetings

This site came out of my desire to write about my love of gardening, but also to connect it to my knowledge derived from home inspections. That is why I tied it to the home inspection site.If you have questions, you can email them to me (frank at yourhoustonhomeinspector.com). For home inspections, call 713.781.6090.
Happy gardening, Frank

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